Harriet Tubman (Women’s History Month Post #2)

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For my second Women’s History Month illustration, I chose to draw the ever-inspiring Harriet Tubman. I’ll be continuing to post drawings I’ve done of women who have helped shape history throughout the month as part of Cupcake & Machetes’ Women’s History Month Blog Event. (Be sure to check out her post to learn all about it and maybe even join in on the fun if you haven’t already!) πŸ˜‰

If you’re familiar with U.S. History, you’ve no doubt heard this heroic woman’s name. If you haven’t, or even if you just want to possibly learn more about her, let me fill you in a little on Harriet Tubman and her amazing legacy.

Harriet Tubman cemented her place in American history by fighting back against slavery and freeing not only herself, but many other enslaved people through her work with the Underground Railroad. Her awesomeness does not stop there, though. She even became an armed scout, recruiter, and Union spy during the American Civil War. She became the first woman in United States history to lead a military expedition. And she managed to do all of this after being born into slavery in 1822, in a time when not only her race, but also her gender, were things that would be exploited and used against her.

She was a leading abolitionist, and devoted her entire life to fighting for the freedom of others. Her work was far from done upon the end of the Civil War. She then proceeded to put all she had into helping former slaves, as well as the elderly. Seriously, is it even possible for this woman to get any more inspiring? ❀

HARRIET TUBMAN QUOTES:

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“Every great dream begins with a dreamer. Always remember, you have within you the strength, the patience, and the passion to reach for the stars to change the world.”

“I was the conductor of the Underground Railroad for eight years, and I can say what most conductors can’t cay; I never ran my train off the track and I never lost a passenger.”

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Let’s Celebrate Women’s History Month!

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March is Women’s History Month, so it’s the perfect time to celebrate the awesomeness of women. Cupcakes and Machetes had the wonderful idea to host a blog event to do just that, so of course I had to participate! πŸ™‚

Her mission is pretty straight forward, so I’ll let it speak for itself with a quote from her post: “Let’s celebrate women. Every kind, in every way, in whatever way you see fit. For myself, I’m going to read only female authors for the entire month. My hope is that other blogs sign up to celebrate women in any way they would like to contribute and I’ll post weekly updates to these blogs and what they’ve worked on. Not only will this be great fun, I think it will be a helpful way to highlight your blog and meet other interesting people.”

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If you’re interested, head on over to C&M’s awesome blog and leave her a comment on her event post. I’m going to be joining in on the fun by illustrating different women who have left their marks on history in one way or another. I’ll try to squeeze as many as I can in throughout the month, along with short little bios explaining the things these bad ass ladies have accomplished and how they’ve helped to change the world and inspire others. I’ll also be posting reviews of comics that feature ladies as the protagonists. (My plans are to read and review Paper Girls, Lumberjanes, some more Giant Days, Bitch Planet and some more Rat Queens!) It’s gonna be a busy, lady-filled month of posts, and I’m really looking forward to it. Hopefully some of you will decide to join in on the fun, too! πŸ˜€

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Susan from Giant Days, a comic filled with delightful female characters.

 

Sweet/Vicious

I will admit: I am normally pretty bad about remembering to (and making time to) watch television shows. Even ones I really, really like. This, however, is not the case with MTV’s Sweet/Vicious. I know some of you may have already rolled your eyes at the fact that it is an MTV show, but stick with me on this one because it’s actually pretty great.

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The show follows the two vigilantes pictured above, Jules (left) and Ophelia (right).

We all know about the alarming rate of sexual assaults and rape reported on college campuses and how they oftentimes either go completely ignored, or the person who forced themselves on another is merely slapped on the wrist with an insultingly light sentence. This show tackles this issue. Like, they literally tackle it and beat the ever living hell out of it, with Jules and Ophelia taking the law into their own hands and going all Batman and Robin on their targets.

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Well, okay, maybe not Robin.

So, what is it I love so much about this show? Why, dear reader, let me tell you:

The Writing: this show is like a roller coaster at times, but in a good way. It manages to be funny and witty but still shine a light on some of our darkest moments we may have to endure as humans living among other humans: things like rape, racial prejudice, living with PTSD, and how hard it can be to open up to those you care about most. Another thing I like about the writing is that it doesn’t come across like one of those preachy after school specials.

The Characters: I don’t even just mean the main characters, either. All of them. Each character has flaws and strengths. Their relationships (platonic and romantic alike) have highs and lows and confusing middle grounds. There are also several likeable characters (Ophelia, Jules, and Harris being my favorites).

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Tell ’em, Harris!

How Relevant It Is: One of the main reasons I felt compelled to write this review is that I was shocked to discover that not a lot of people seem to know about this show despite how totally relevant it is. Last Saturday’s protests all over the globe in support of women’s rights and equality only serve to prove just how relevant. We’re standing up together and fighting back as a society against oppression and injustice in the many forms it continues to rear its ugly head. Granted Jules and Ophelia are literally fighting back, but we’ll touch on that subject in just a moment. πŸ˜‰

So, now that I’ve gushed about the reasons I enjoy the show, I suppose it’s only fair to discuss some of the negative things I’ve heard others say about it. I’ve read a few complaints online that this show glorifies the dangerous and oftentimes morally questionable act of vigilantism. I have a few issues with this complaint. My counter-argument would be that the show does look at this stance from multiple viewpoints, even having Jules and Ophelia struggle with what they are and are not willing to do in their quest for justice. It isn’t all happy-g0-lucky-scumbag-beatdowns I’ll have you know. Jules especially grapples with this, a rape survivor herself. For her, this is personal.

The other complaint I’ve read more than just a couple times is that the show “depicts all men in a negative light”. NOPE. Try again. This show depicts RAPISTS and people who sexually assault and shame others in an accurately negative light that they deserve. And it does so in a way that is not solely directed toward males, with an episode devoted specifically to taking down girls who take their sorority hazing of hopeful pledges too far. Not to mention, the great male characters also included in the cast, I fail to see how they contribute to the show’s unearned reputation of treating “ALL guys” in a negative way. Exhibit A: I’m looking at you again, Harris. πŸ˜‰

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Harris and his love for Peanut Butter Froyo. Who can blame the guy? This delightful picture is from Fangirlish so credit to them for that! πŸ™‚